Blind friendly Buildings

How to make buildings blind friendly

Persons with visual impairment often rely on their memory to navigate around a building. They are generally given a firsthand orientation by a sighted person about the building on the first entry, and certain landmarks are pointed out to them. These landmarks are often very distinct, so that they can be imbedded in the memory of the blind person. Visible landmarks are an important aspect which must be followed while making blind friendly buildings. The design must be logical and simple for easy and independent navigation.

For instance,

Having toilets near the eating area or main reception area or placing soap and hand drying facilities adjacent to the washbasin area, having ramps in certain areas for easy identification, and railings along the stairways. It is easy for low vision persons to orient themselves in a building if right angle system has been used. It is advisable that diagonal elements should be avoided. Large open space areas should be broken down in to smaller areas so as to make landmarks easily identifiable.

People with visual impairment feel less secure the further they are away from "landmarks" such as walls and furniture. Large open areas can be made more manageable by using partitioning and furniture to establish clear pathways.

 

Important functional areas such as elevators, stairways, toilets, classrooms, eating areas, should be placed as centrally as possible so as to avoid confusion.

Light fittings and wiring should be positioned in such a way so as to avoid direct shining in to the eyes, as it may hamper those who have residual vision. The blind should be given proper orientation of the wiring and lighting of the building, if it is to be frequently used by them.

Colour contrasts are important in buildings for low vision persons. They should be used to highlight potential hazards in a building. Poles should be placed near play areas, and near fire extinguishers so as to provide the blind with the indication that these items are there.

Tactile ground surfaces should be placed in certain parts of the building to help in easy navigation.

Buttons can also be placed so as to indicate the end of a ramp or stairway is approaching.

Tactile indicators can be identified easily by the cane, and therefore it is helpful for the blind person to orient.

While making parks for the blind following should be kept in mind.

There should be tactile indicators indicating each play item in the park, so that the blind child can feel and identify the place with his or her cane.

It is essential that ample space is left for them to walk, and run

Poles should be placed in certain areas so as to conduct guide running.

 

How to make buildings blind friendly

Persons with visual impairment often rely on their memory to navigate around a building. They are generally given a firsthand orientation by a sighted person about the building on the first entry, and certain landmarks are pointed out to them. These landmarks are often very distinct, so that they can be imbedded in the memory of the blind person. Visible landmarks are an important aspect which must be followed while making blind friendly buildings. The design must be logical and simple for easy and independent navigation.

For instance,

Having toilets near the eating area or main reception area or placing soap and hand drying facilities adjacent to the washbasin area, having ramps in certain areas for easy identification, and railings along the stairways. It is easy for low vision persons to orient themselves in a building if right angle system has been used. It is advisable that diagonal elements should be avoided. Large open space areas should be broken down in to smaller areas so as to make landmarks easily identifiable.

People with visual impairment feel less secure the further they are away from "landmarks" such as walls and furniture. Large open areas can be made more manageable by using partitioning and furniture to establish clear pathways.

 

Important functional areas such as elevators, stairways, toilets, classrooms, eating areas, should be placed as centrally as possible so as to avoid confusion.

Light fittings and wiring should be positioned in such a way so as to avoid direct shining in to the eyes, as it may hamper those who have residual vision. The blind should be given proper orientation of the wiring and lighting of the building, if it is to be frequently used by them.

Colour contrasts are important in buildings for low vision persons. They should be used to highlight potential hazards in a building. Poles should be placed near play areas, and near fire extinguishers so as to provide the blind with the indication that these items are there.

Tactile ground surfaces should be placed in certain parts of the building to help in easy navigation.

Buttons can also be placed so as to indicate the end of a ramp or stairway is approaching.

Tactile indicators can be identified easily by the cane, and therefore it is helpful for the blind person to orient.

While making parks for the blind following should be kept in mind.

There should be tactile indicators indicating each play item in the park, so that the blind child can feel and identify the place with his or her cane.

It is essential that ample space is left for them to walk, and run

Poles should be placed in certain areas so as to conduct guide running.

Here you shall find all necessary order and circulars relating to the welfare of persons with visual impairment in Kerala